• Holy Childhood Association
  • Holy Childhood Association
  • Holy Childhood Association
  • Holy Childhood Association
  • Holy Childhood Association
  • Holy Childhood Association

Back to School... with the Missions!


Gathering up supplies. Packing backpacks. Thinking about snacks.

Children here at home are all about these activities as another school year begins.  And children in the Missions are doing the same – thanks to YOUR help!

About 65 cents of every dollar of the generous offerings to the Missionary Childhood Association (MCA) helps provide tuition, books, uniforms and snacks for some 650,000 children in kindergarten through eighth grade in schools in the Missions of Africa and Asia, the Pacific Islands and parts of Latin America and Europe.

And for this school year, MCA also has materials that can help your children learn more about their brothers and sisters around the world.  Download those materials below, including our Fall It’s Our World newsletter (grades kindergarten through eight).  For a complete list of MCA resources, download our Programs and Calendar Guide for 2014/15**.


 

Missionary Childhood Association
Welcome PDF Print E-mail

We Are Missionaries!

 

First heard at Baptism, the call to share our faith — to be missionaries — is truly connected to every moment of every day. The Missionary Childhood Association (MCA) offers young Catholics and their families opportunities to
make those daily connections.

To learn more or place an order for2014-2015 materials, visit www.MCAKids.org. New to teaching about mission? Download our Mission Education Guidelines for teachers and catechists.

World Mission Rosary Video - For Elementary Students

 

In February of 1951, Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen (national director of the Society for the Propagation of the Faith from 1950 to 1966), in a radio address (The Catholic Hour), inaugurated the World Mission Rosary. He saw the need for us to pray not just for ourselves, but for the whole world, and especially for those who are poor and vulnerable at home and around the world.

Each decade of that World Mission Rosary calls to mind an area where the Church continues her evangelizing mission: green for the forests and grasslands of Africa; blue for the ocean surrounding the islands of the Pacific; white symbolizing Europe, the seat of the Holy Father, shepherd of the world; red calling to mind the fire of faith that brought missionaries to the Americas and yellow, the morning light of the East, for Asia. Archbishop Sheen himself linked this Rosary to the missionary work of the Church and to the Holy Father. Praying this Rosary, he explained in that radio broadcast, would "aid the Holy Father and his Society for the Propagation of the Faith by supplying him with practical support, as well as prayers, for the poor mission territories of the world." "When the Rosary is completed, one has...embraced all continents, all people in prayer," he added. "Won't you please make a tour of the world on your World Mission Rosary?"

Our History

Bishop Charles de Forbin-Janson was much in demand. Many French bishops who were serving as missionaries in the United States – the “Missions” of his day – wanted this bishop of Nancy in France to visit the young U.S. churches and then return home to encourage interest and support for their work.

forbinjansonIn 1839, Bishop Forbin-Janson did just that, sailing across the ocean and landing in New York, where he was welcomed with open arms by Bishop John Dubois. “Poor New York,” he wrote to Catholics back in France, “there is not yet a minor or major seminary… and this diocese is larger than all of England. There are already 200,000 Catholics, with the City of New York having about 24,000. Here everything is to be done for the sake of religion.”

Continuing his travels, Bishop Forbin-Janson also visited New Orleans and Baltimore, as well as Canada, all on horseback. He preached retreats, celebrated Masses for congregations packed into small churches and chapels, and gathered children for religious instruction. Two years later, he returned to France.

Once home he met an old friend – Pauline Jaricot – who had founded the Society that was helping to support the missionary efforts he had seen firsthand in the United States. Bishop Forbin-Janson had returned home determined to “arouse great interest for the useful work of the Propagation of the Faith.”

During a conversation between these two friends in 1843, Bishop Forbin-Janson shared his own longtime dream – to help the children of the Missions. Like Pauline, he saw the “riches” of the poor mission churches of his day. And he was convinced that though weak and needing care, children rich in faith and love were capable of playing their own part in the Church’s mission – and of even stirring adults to the same generous missionary spirit.

Some time during the course of their talk, the Holy Childhood Association, now Missionary Childhood Association (MCA), was born. Bishop Forbin-Janson started appealing to the children of France to reach out – in faith and love – to help the children of the Missions of our country and China.

Today, MCA continues to follow the vision of Bishop Forbin-Janson – “children helping children.” After learning about the great needs of the world’s poorest children, young people are invited to pray and to offer financial help so that children in the Missions today may know Christ and experience His love and care.

 

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